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Posts Tagged ‘National Shooting Sports Foundation’

So, what’s the best approach for you, the bird, and Buddy?

Here’s a lesson I’m learning almost weekly this time of year. Maybe you, too. You trudge up the hill to find your dog on point. He’s steady. Birds cooperative. Until you take over, that is.

Once he’s pinned a bird, I try to help Buddy do a great job handling it. I approach from at least an oblique angle, not striding right past. He’s less likely to break point. If I can, I get birds to hold instead of run by squeezing them between Buddy and me.

Want another reason to approach your dog from the front? He’s not right under the muzzle blast and it’s deafening effect. That way, he’ll have one less excuse for not hearing my commands. Even when I miss. Which is often.

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The reason we go

The reason we go

Protein is not the prime objective for Wingshooting USA TV viewers when they take to the uplands in search of pheasant, quail and grouse. That’s one revelation in show host Scott Linden’s fourth annual “Upland Nation Index,” a national survey of his viewers. The languishing economy might prompt big-game hunters and waterfowlers to make meat for the pot a priority; in fact, a recent more general survey identified a rising trend among hunters going afield primarily to supplement their pantries. But Linden says for upland bird hunters, food isn’t their primary objective.

“Watching my dog work” is the main reason Linden’s fans go hunting, according to his survey. With over 33 percent of Wingshooting USA viewers owning two or more dogs, that shouldn’t be surprising. And while that may be a full house for some, 28 percent of Linden’s fans are planning to buy another dog soon, say respondents.

“Being with friends and family” is the number two reason viewers hunt, being in natural surroundings ranks third, and “bringing home food” ranks dead last among choices in the Index. Speaking of priorities, Wingshooting USA TV fans live, eat and breathe shotgunning and bird dogs. When they’re not hunting, their principal free-time activities are dog training and clay target shooting (42 percent each).

Where are they going in pursuit of their passions? Forty-five percent hunt public land almost exclusively. Forty-two percent hunt private land via one of the landowner access programs or by asking permission, and the remaining 13 percent hunt primarily on preserves.

Linden’s fans are a restless lot too. Fifty-six percent plan to hunt outside their home state, with South Dakota the prime destination (25 percent of all out-of-state trips) and Kansas capturing the interest of another 17 percent.

The Upland Nation Index surveyed 1,700 viewers of the Wingshooting USA television program in January, 2013. The margin for error is plus or minus five percent. Wingshooting USA is the most-watched upland bird hunting show in the U.S., airing on seven networks including a debut on Discovery Channel’s Destination America this summer. It is the official TV series of the National Shooting Sports Foundation.

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Hard-earned birds. Good boy Buddy!

Hard-earned birds. Good boy Buddy!

Wild birds? Yah, we got ’em. The newest show in our archives was shot at Flying Double F Ranch near Vale, Ore.  If you love burning boot leather and shooting while huffing and puffing, go here and enjoy!

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Enter today and you could be in the picture too next year.

Why haven’t you entered our Take Your Kid Hunting contest? Maybe next year, you could join us at Quail Creek Plantation in Florida.

Our just-completed Take Your Kid trip to Ruggs Ranch was a trip-of-a-lifetime for the Burdick family. World-class hunting and hospitality, spectacular canine athletes, awe-inspiring setting and of course, birds that stirred the soul and got the adrenaline flowing. What a great way to introduce your son or daughter to our sport.

Sweepstakes ends soon, and you can’t win if you don’t enter. Go here, now. Good luck.

And it’s all made possible by the National Shooting Sports Foundation.

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Wild West? We just lived it! Lynn Burdick and her sons Zach and Nick joined us as winners of the National Shooting Sports Foundation’s “Take Your Kid Hunting” sweepstakes, and what an adventure it was. Weather, horses, wagons, chukars, pheasants, Huns, lots of noise and a bucket-list experience for all.

Ruggs Ranch was the destination and we took full advantage of their 86,000 acres. Cropland, river bottoms, high country prairie, dramatic rocky canyons … all harbored birds to challenge the hard-working Ruggs dogs. Here’s a taste of the first day, which started at the Filson store in Portland where the Burdicks were ably outfitted by manager Nathan Gray. Don’t they look sporty in their Filson gear? Stay tuned – more to come!

Our first stop enroute: Historic Balch Hotel, Dufur, Oregon.

Zach, Lynn & Nick, ready to rock

Our first hunt was from a wagon, along the Rock Creek Canyon. Pheasants were the quarry.

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Yet another way to watch the show: MAVTV. This progressive and growing network is on Dish Network (satellite channel #361) and several hundred cable systems. We launch this Saturday at 2 p.m. Eastern time, so check us out!

Learn more about MAVTV here.

Find out where to watch on MAVTV here.

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News release: Wingshooting USA helps members, supporters raise funds with a mouse click

Scott Linden hopes to put TruckVault’s money where his viewers’ mouse is. The second annual version of his public service fundraiser launches June 25 on the six TV networks carrying his show, Wingshooting USA. Dubbed “TruckVault Cares … about conservation, canines & kids,” the initiative motivates sportsmen to raise funds and awareness for six different groups, and possibly win prizes for themselves.

Six groups benefit from votes tallied at www.truckvaultcares.com: Ruffed Grouse Society, International Hunter Education Association, Quail Unlimited, National 4H Shooting Sports, Scholastic Clay Target Program, and a nationwide coalition of hunting dog rescue clubs. Linden says all groups also benefit from the “cross-pollination” among shared and potential members who learn more about each group when they vote and watch informational segments on his TV show. Together, the groups claim over a million member-supporters.

Last year’s effort attracted over 170,000 web visits, and this year’s should prove just as popular, Linden said. This year prizes will be awarded every 5,000 votes as well as at the conclusion of voting on Dec. 31, 2012. A South Dakota duck and pheasant hunt at Warne Ranch is one of the prizes, as are Peet shoe dryers, Kent Cartridge ammunition, Filson apparel, a TruckVault, Ugly Dog Hunting Co. gear, and Happy Jack dog care products.

Last year, each group was represented at the online voting site by a Labrador puppy. Viewers have chosen English Setters as the breed for this year’s pups. Every vote puts kibble into the pup’s food bowl and sends a proportional amount of the $10,000 fund to that group’s treasury.

Through television commercials and in-show educational features, print ads and online promotion, Wingshooting USA viewers will be urged to vote online for their favorite group, and motivate their friends to vote. Members can also use social media to “get out the vote” among friends, sending new voters to the site to raise even more funds.

Wingshooting USA is the official TV series of the National Shooting Sports Foundation. Created and hosted by Scott Linden, the program airs on six networks year-round, available in 207 million households via cable, satellite and over-the-air stations in all media markets

 

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